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Mitsubishi & Coachman

 
 

The Mitsubishi Pajero IV [long body] - 3.2 Di-D aut. and the Coachman Amara 570/6 with a laden weight of 1585 kg is a good match.

66 %

1585 kg 2415 kg
85 kg

Score: 8.4


32% * 

Weight
weight ratio
towball limit
stability
Flat roads
speed
acceleration
5th gear
Mountains
speed
hill starts
driving

* without the use of low gear

Good

  • Car is relatively heavy compared to caravan
  • Hill starts
  • Usability highest gear

Bad

  • No salient features

Verdict

The Mitsubishi Pajero IV [long body] - 3.2 Di-D aut. and the Coachman Amara 570/6 of a laden weight of 1585 kg is an excellent combination for all journeys on all kinds of roads.

Weight

The chance of snaking is relatively small at normal speed, if the caravan is well loaded.

Flat roads

The performances of the engine of this outfit are in general very good. Under all conditions on motorways it is possible to drive with 60 mph in the 5th gear. In that case the engine runs approximately 1900 rpm. In a headwind or for example on a crossover there is no need to downshift immediately.

Mountains

On most motorways inclines (1:20) driving is easily possible in the 4th gear with 50 mph and even full throttle with 60 mph. In the 3th gear the top speed is 63 mph (3949 rpm). Hill starts are possible on steep slopes, theoretical up to 33%, if the wheels have sufficient traction. Because the car does not have enough power at low revs, we recommend a gradient of more than 25% not to drive.

Attention: This car can easily drive much faster with the caravan than is safe. So always keep an eye on your speed!


Results

The main details in a list. Ideal for comparing different combinations with one another, for example your present with a new one.

 

Weight
Towing limit
3300 kg
Weight ratio
66%
(laden Caravan / laden Car)
(1585 kg / 2415 kg)
Noseweight
Towball limit
115 kg
Advise
85 kg
Stability
Score at optimal noseweight
8.4
Infuence pay load
18%
Flat roads
Top speed
89 mph (4th gear)
At headwind
84 mph
Speed in practice
79 mph (5th gear)
Acceleration
0 - 60 mph
24.8 sec. - (max. 19.7 sec.)
30 - 60 mph
17.8 sec. - (max. 13.3 sec.)
50 - 60 mph
4th gear: 8.4 sec. (max. 5.8 sec.)
Power at 60 mph
Highest (5th) gear
often useful
Gears in practice
5th gear
4th gear
Revs at 60 mph
1930
2644
Percentage between accelerator
63% - 72%
44% - 51%
Power needed at 60 mph 1637 N
over: 1005 N
over: 2206 N
Motorway inclines 1:20
Speed (maximum)
60 mph - (63 mph)
In the
4th gear - (3th gear)
Revs
2644 - (3949)
Acceleration 30 - 50 mph
23.2 sec. - (max. 13.5 sec.)
Normaly at 50 mph in the
4th gear
By revs
2203
Percentage accelerator
89%
By full throttle
Hill starts
Maximum incline
31.3% - 33.8%
Minimum speed (whereby power)
6 mph - (11 mph)
Mountain roads
Maximum slope driving
31.3%
Maximum speed on 1:8
42 mph in the 2th gear

 

Download a fact sheet in PDF


Details combination

You may customize the data to your own situation.

Car
Mitsubishi Pajero IV [long body] - 3.2 Di-D aut.
Year
February 2007 - up to now
Power
kW (170 bhp) at rpm
Torque
Nm at - rpm
Kerbweight
kg user payload kg
Tyres
/ R
Gearbox
automatic with 5 gears and torque converter (en met low gear)
Towing limit
kg (towball limit kg)
Caravan
Coachman Amara 570/6
MIRO
kg Payload kg
MTPLM
kg
Height:
m. (8'7")
Overall width:
m. (7'5")
Overall body lenght:
m. (20'9")
Shipping length:
m. (24'8")
Actual gross train weight
4000 kg
Stated vehicle gross train weight
kg


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Reviews

The Mitsubishi towing a Coachman Amara 570/6 (1585) kg reviewed by jake:

i have a MK4 2014 shogun 3.2 Di-D (198bhp/441NM) but its not listed here....

i must be hyper sensitive because i can definitely tell i have a 1600kg 7.5m long box dragging behind me. OK its not as noticeable as my previous car (outlander) but i still know its there, irritates me when caravanners boast "tows like the caravan isnt there" because common sense tells you the additional weight and wind resistance is going to have an effect on the performance (of course this is common sense and that doesn't really come into caravanning does it ha ha).

back to the review

good points: tows absolutely rock solid which takes a lot of the stress out of the towing experience. the Gadget spec in my SG4 keeps my sons so happy they dont want to get out of the car when we arrive and dont complain "are we nearly there yet". for me its compertable and it can carry a lot of stuff or 6 passengers if required.

bad points: fuel consumption is dreadful 19mpg towing 32 on a long trip 30mpg round town (on a good day). costs £90 to fill with diesel and will burn that in 300 miles towing which makes for an expensive weekend away (compared with driving a small car to a hotel)

Auto box is shockingly bad, at 60mph on cruise switches between overdrive and 5th regularly when a small ammount of additional power required and it cant be manually overridden. the engine sits at 2500rpm when not in overdrive so makes it noisy. the old school torque converter seems to slip most of the time as well the car would be so much nicer with a 6 speed manual or a DSG type auto.

the shogun really is a Utility vehicle with some nice refinements in the cabin but it drives and feels like an agricultural vehicle.



The Mitsubishi towing a Swift Conqueror 655 TA (1680) kg reviewed by Tim:

I recently towed the van to Spain and back. Great performance - hardly knew the van was there! Full av 25mpg - not bad considering the wife "packed" her summer outfits.

The Mitsubishi towing a Swift Conqueror 645 (1732) kg reviewed by Tim:

GREAT!! I have yet to do a long journey but quite honestly you forget that the van is on the back. Highly recommend


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